Thursday, July 12, 2007

socnet specialist


Some things are reachable only by water.

In other words, it takes some effort, you must navigate in a new way, step out of your comfort zone. The best things in life come through struggle and sticking to it until perfection.

That North Vietnamese farmhouse, in the photo above, is reachable only by water.

Being a socnet specialist is an accomplishment that is reachable only by water, i.e. hard work and strong motivation.

It's not easy being a socnet specialist.

I tried to come up with a sober, modest term to describe a person who's addicted to socnets and can't stop. As our addiction takes us deeper into the murky realms of presencing streams and personal portals, we become experts on what users expect and need.

We study and interact with socnets, with potential for clients in mind. We are thinking: "How might my client use this, or how could I use it for him or her, for marketing or influencing?"

Socnets offer fast message distribution. With Pownce, you can also distribute files, like photo jpegs and music mp3s, or podcasts. Each socnet offers a unique twist, with varying degrees of user control over their personal profile and pages. On some socnets you can aggregate the feeds of all your other socnets, blogs, and websites, if they have RSS/Atom URLs.

Socnet addiction can be transformed into a marketable skill. You learn how to fit in with online communities, make friends, share beta invites and links to cool sites, and be a good, participating member of a group. By being helpful, offering free work, and revealing aspects of your personality and interests, you become credible and trusted.

Socnet trust is hard to come by, since avatared personas may not be what they seem. You begin to get a feel for it, a sense of what's real and what's incentivized, what's genuine and what's fake. Like the phony "delta airlines" account on Twitter, pretending to represent the company. We exposed the charade and after a few messages, it faded away.

Trolls try to do their dirty work, but can be bashed or ignored into non-existence, usually in a few months at most.

Last night I counted 38 socnets (social networks) that I've joined. That means, in most cases, building a profile page, uploading photos and music mp3s, and messing around with some functionalities.

It's work, not a lot of fun, though there is a euphoria in it. What drives me is curiosity, dissatisfaction, and expectation. I know a perfect, ultimate socnet will be developed, and I've devoted an entire secret project, code name Pinnacle, to this goal.

If you're interested in how socnets can be used for business, political campaigns, or personal purposes, contact me. The research is ongoing, feverish, and very fruitful.


EDIT UPDATE

Here are some of the socnets I'm on, with varying degrees of involvement. Some are tool-oriented, with minimal community or networking, but all are social to some degree. (I"ve skipped blogs that require registration, though there is community revolving around them.)

Often, I'll spend a lot of time and effort on one, until I have it pretty well configured and figured out, then move on to another. Others are frequently updated and tweaked.

Most of them are "name".com, as in http://zaadz.com

MySpace
Facebook
Twitter
Pownce
Jaiku
8apps
Zaadz
RockYou
Mashable
Ning
Yippykya
Campfire
Digg
Dabble
ZD Net
Archive.org
Spock
Freebase
Gleamd
Fauxto
Mahalo
GarageBand
Podsafe Music Network
IODA Promonet
Thinkature
ArtsCad
WM Share
Wikinomics
eWork Markets
Dice
LinkedIn
Mojizu
Tumblr
del.icio.us
folkd.com
Correlate.us
TagsAhoy
flickr
Lifehacker
FoxyTunes Planet
Library Thing
Swicki/Eurekster
YouTube (Director Account)
Revver
Justin.TV
UstreamTV
BlogTV
BlipTV
eyespot
Virb
Squidoo
Gather
Socialtext
Blog-City
Opera Community
Boxes & Arrows
We Are Smarter Than We
Evolt
DevZone
Slashdot
SourceForge
MyBlogLog
Programmable Web
Linux.com
Buzz Sponge
Blinklist
MyChingo
Place4Friends
BlogBurst
Wallop
Open Politics
Online Journalism Review
Personal Democracy Forum
Poynter.org
Geek.com
TechRepublic
CSS Forum
Art Forum Talkback
Audacity User Group
Odeo
epinions
Busy Thumbs
O'Riley Network







Photo credit: Keithor

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