Monday, November 14, 2005

New data transmission speed record set


New data transmission
speed record set


Darn light, it's so sluggishly slow.

I just got an email from my pals at Internet2, and I thought I should pass this on to my readers.

Like the Interplanetary Internet (see my sidebar link), Internet2 trivia makes for good ice-breaking party conversation, and could just end up coupling you with that "One Perfect Soul Mate", who knows?


[QUOTE]

NEW INTERNET PERFORMANCE RECORD SET

Team sets new performance threshold in Internet2 Land Speed Record Contest

ANN ARBOR, MI - November 14, 2005 -

Internet2(R) today announced that an international team set a new Internet2 Land Speed Records (I2-LSR) in both the IPv6 single-stream and IPv6 multi-stream categories.

As an open and ongoing competition for the highest-bandwidth, end-to-end networks, Internet2 LSR marks represent the rate at which data is transferred multiplied by the distance traveled.

The most recent record setter demonstrated the ability to send more than five and a half gigabits of data per second (Gbps) across a distance spanning three-quarters the circumference of the Earth.

Because of delays due to the speed of light and other factors, data transfer over the Internet becomes more challenging as speed, or distance, or both increase.

The team from the University of Tokyo, the WIDE Project, and Chelsio Communications worked together to successfully transfer data at a rate of 5.58 Gbps over a distance of over 30,000 kilometers traversing the WIDE, IEEAF, JGN2 networks. Achieving a mark of 167,400 terabit-meters per second (Tb-m/s), the team more than doubled the existing record, surpassing it by 131 percent.

The team utilized an "Inter-layer coordinating optimization" technology developed by the Data Reservoir project at the University of Tokyo and used 10 Gbps Ethernet adapters by Chelsio Communications to fine-tune the output rate.

"Devising a methodology to prevent unnecessary packet losses at the receiving end has always remained a critical obstacle in achieving very high-bandwidth TCP. By leveraging several kinds of fine tuning methods on packet intervals, our team has been successful in creating technology that we believe will prove indispensable for high-utilization of 10Gbps networks in the future," said Dr. Kei Hiraki, professor at the University of Tokyo.

For more information about this record-setting attempt, see: http://data-reservoir.adm.s.
u-tokyo.ac.jp/lsr-20051029/sub.html

Additionally, to pave the way for this record attempt, the team was also successful in transmitting data at an even higher rate of 5.94 Gbps for over 15,461 kilometers in the IPv6 single and multi-stream categories. The data crossed the WIDE, JGN2, and IEEAF networks.

"The Internet2 Land Speed Record competition has provided a creative venue for leading research institutions in collaboration with network providers to push the limits of IP networking," said Rich Carlson, chair of the Internet2 Land Speed Record Judging Panel.

"The latest record has established a new data transfer benchmark using next-generation IPv6 protocols, demonstrating that the research community continues to pioneer the use of leading-edge Internet technologies."

Details of past winning entries, complete rules, submission guidelines, and additional details are available at:

http://lsr.internet2.edu/

About Internet2(R)

Led by more than 200 U.S. universities working with industry and government, Internet2 develops and deploys advanced network applications and technologies for research and higher education, accelerating the creation of tomorrow's Internet.

Internet2 recreates the partnerships among academia, industry, and government that helped foster today's Internet in its infancy.

For more information, visit: www.internet2.edu.


Lauren Rotman



I2-NEWS archives are available at:
https://mail.internet2.edu/wws/arc/i2-news


[signed] Steven Streight aka Vaspers the Grate

:^)

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Great , this was cool. Like to see more posts. I have bookmarked this blog

Thanks

Anonymous said...

This was very informative.


Thanks